Don’t say NO! Our experiences with PDA 


Last year I wrote 2 posts on PDA (Pathological Demand Aviodance,) 

https://sensorysensitivemummy2.wordpress.com/2016/06/26/pathological-demand-avoidance-pda

And: 

https://sensorysensitivemummy2.wordpress.com/2016/06/26/pda-part-2/

Both of which explain the main features or ‘traits’ of PDA, so for PDA Action day (15/05/17) I decided to share how PDA looks in our household. 

Avoiding negative phrases and ‘demands.’ 

The worst response I can give when my daughter, Lou (5) asks me a question is “No.” In our household saying “No” outright usually results in objects being thrown, shouting, screaming, hitting, kicking and could result in a total meltdown. 

From researching PDA over the past year, I realise how important it is to think carefully about how we word every phrase for our daughter, it’s taken so long to get used to and you have be quick-thinking and very often think ‘outside the box.’ Lou has a lot of obsessions around food, she repeatedly states to us that she’s hungry, she never feels full. If Lou asks for something to eat and she’s already had plenty to eat only minutes before, we simply cannot reply “No,” nor “not now,” as I discussed previously, this will result in a great deal of anger and frustration and things get thrown! We have to use a visual chart where we point to the meal and time of day, Lou removes the snack card and we point to the next meal, e.g lunch and say: “next time we have food is lunchtime.” We use minimal language and often have to repeat the same words to aid her understanding. Not saying “No” is a very difficult thing to do! Having to think of what to say before you say it every time takes a great deal of my ‘brain energy!’ 

Lou will avoid any demand put onto her, getting her dressed in the mornings often takes both myself and her Daddy, we cannot simply say “get dressed,” as the answer will always be “no,” or she will shout replies back such as: “No you silly Poo,” or “you’re a really silly woman,” she has even told me: “You’re an awful Mother,” (I have no idea where she’s heard this phrase!) It took me a while to get used to these ‘come-backs,’ but I do have to let these ‘outbursts’ go over the top of my head to avoid ‘fuelling her fire’ even more. We have to use choices for absolutely everything: 

“Trousers or T-Shirt” this often still results in “No, I’m not getting dressed today,” when we have to give the choice of: 

“You do it or Mummy/Daddy do it.”

It can often take over 30 mins for Lou to be fully dressed as she also likes to run around the house to see if we can catch her to get dressed! 

This is also the same when it comes to tidying up, we have to give a lot of praise when Lou does tidy up and in the last month I can only remember this happening once, we’ve modelling tidying, but the demand of doing it is just too much for Lou to cope with. We use visuals and ‘Sign-a-Long’ for ‘tidying,’ and other daily routines. These sometimes work with Lou, but also sometimes don’t! We also have to be careful with wording and giving praise as Lou doesn’t cope very well with actually receiving praise, will not know how to handle it and often do something like throw all of the toys around the room in response. 

Lou struggles with sudden or unexpected changes to her routine, even as an adult I am exactly the same! We recently had to leave our holiday 3 days early as Lou had got chicken pox, we had to get the train home 3 days early and we’d planned to take both girls to a theme park for the day, we had previously prepared Lou for this day out with talking through it and visuals of what would happen. When we had to tell her that she couldn’t go to the theme park as she had chicken pox it was like a volcano had erupted! Lou shouted all the way walking to the train station, “adventure park Mummy,” and repeated it and then would say things such as “this place is stupid,” “silly train, silly place.” She also refused to move and sat on the pavement in the middle of the town, in protest! This made me so disappointed for Lou, and the change in the plans had set me off and therefore Lou’s Daddy had to deal with us both all the way to the train station! It took both myself and Lou a good hour or so to finally calm down and adapt to the changes. 

I find it confusing as to how Lou cannot process demands yet she places a lot of demands onto myself as her mother and main care giver, and also her dad. She will say things like “get my snack now,” “I said get me it NOW.” I found this difficult to cope with at first but after reading up on PDA I realise that: 

“People with Pathological Demand Avoidance (PDA) will avoid demands made by others, due to their high anxiety levels when they feel that they are not in control.” 

Source: http://www.pdasociety.org.uk/what-is-PDA/about-pda

I hadn’t pieced together that the anger and frustration I see in Lou is actually all down to anxiety and this manifests more when she doesn’t feel in control of situations. 

There are so many more things I could say about PDA, I’m still learning more every day. It’s exhausting and I feel it’s quite catastrophic, but what we have to do is take positive steps to ensure that our daughter is helped to cope in the best way possible. 

My hope is that PDA does become more widely recognised as I hear so many different experiences where PDA is recognised in certain counties in the UK and yet in others professionals refuse to recognise it. 

PDA certainly does exist, and we live it everyday! 
Brilliant sources of information on PDA: 

The PDA Society – http://www.pdasociety.org.uk/

The PDA Society has created the PDA Panda ambassador for PDA Action day on 15th May 2017. You can read more about it here: 

http://www.pdasociety.org.uk/blog/2017/05/pda-panda-ambassador

Steph’s Two Girls: Steph is a fellow SEND blogger 

http://www.stephstwogirls.co.uk/?m=1

PDA Hearts and Stars: 

https://www.facebook.com/PDAHeartsAndStars/

Riko’s PDA Page: 

https://www.facebook.com/RikosPDApage1/

Sally Cat’s PDA Page: 

https://www.facebook.com/SallyCatPDA/

PDA Soapbox: 

https://www.facebook.com/pdasoapbox/

Love PDA: 

https://lovepda.wordpress.com/

Life with ASD and the Rest:

http://www.lifewithasdandtherest.net/?m=1

Advocate4PDA: 

https://advocate4pda.wordpress.com/

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2 thoughts on “Don’t say NO! Our experiences with PDA 

  1. Aww thanks for the mention. I see a lot of this from our girl too – eating is an issue for us and there’s no way she will tidy anything unless it’s a one-off special because she feels like it!! And yes, we always used to say her favourite word is no to use herself, but we are never allowed to use it to her! Sure keeps us on our toes 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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